New York Systems

I'm David. I live in Astoria. During the day I work at a startup. Other times I visit bookstores.
This blog is my curio collection, sort of. I'll have a place of my own for essays... someday.

Posts tagged #tech

“Kaspersky Lab announces the discovery of a highly sophisticated malicious program that is actively being used as a cyber weapon attacking entities in several countries. The complexity and functionality of the newly discovered malicious program exceed those of all other cyber menaces known to date. “The malware was discovered by Kaspersky Lab’s experts during an investigation prompted by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). The malicious program, detected as Worm.Win32.Flame by Kaspersky Lab’s security products, is designed to carry out cyber espionage. It can steal valuable information, including but not limited to computer display contents, information about targeted systems, stored files, contact data and even audio conversations. “The independent research was initiated by ITU and Kaspersky Lab after a series of incidents with another, still unknown, destructive malware program – codenamed Wiper – which deleted data on a number of computers in the Western Asia region. This particular malware is yet to be discovered, but during the analysis of these incidents, Kaspersky Lab’s experts, in coordination with ITU, came across a new type of malware, now known as Flame. Preliminary findings indicate that this malware has been “in the wild” for more than two years – since March 2010. Due to its extreme complexity, plus the targeted nature of the attacks, no security software detected it. “Although the features of Flame differ compared with those of previous notable cyber weapons such as Duqu and Stuxnet, the geography of attacks, use of specific software vulnerabilities, and the fact that only selected computers are being targeted all indicate that Flame belongs to the same category of super-cyberweapons….”

Interesting note that they found this piece of industrial-grade spyware — and that’s what it is, spyware, not “malware” — while looking for something else all the more illusive. Metaphors about the networked computer world being a jungle are becoming less and less metaphorical.

'Flame,' a cyberweapon that makes Stuxnet look cheap | Beyond The Beyond | Wired.com

I’m OK with this.

New Nook Simple Touch with ‘GlowLight’ front-lit screen revealed by store signage | The Verge

A reminder: I know nothing. (Really. They don’t tell us front-line salesmen anything.)

Brilliant!

My god.

Wish mine wasn’t broken. It functions pretty well as a reader, too.

Nook Simple Touch multitouch hack turns e-reader into a monochrome $99 Android tablet | The Verge

laughingsquid:

Giant QR Code on Roof of New Facebook Headquarters

For the next time a giant with an iPhone comes wandering through the neighborhood.

SO I fired up IE9 after Chrome decided that implementing the <blink> tag was beneath it, and lo and behold not only does IE9 also hate classic web standards, but it fails to properly render the neat parts of jwz.org/blog's comment list threading.

Not that anyone reading jwz’s blog is using IE9 if they can help it.

Gliimpse - A new way of previewing HTML and LaTeX (by dragice999, via Coding Horror)

publicradiointernational:

British company Pavegen has developed a new paving tile that captures the energy of footsteps and turns it into electricity.

On a small scale, one day’s worth of foot traffic over a few tiles could power one street light overnight. In another recent field test at a music festival, dancers stomping on a dance floor with Pavegen tiles generated enough energy to recharge their mobile phones.

The company’s first big field test will come this summer at the London Olympics. Pavegen will be installing its system just outside the Westfield Stratford Shopping Center, one of Europe’s biggest and busiest urban shopping malls. The tiles will be placed on one of the main pedestrian thoroughfares leading into nearby London Olympic Park. Depending on the foot traffic, the company hopes its tiles might be able to power the mall’s entire lighting system. More.

(Image: Pavegen)

I think we’re on the verge, right now, of solving the artificial-heart problem for good. All we had to do was get rid of the pulse.